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Point of Sale materials


ny_spirits

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Sorry if this is a dimwitted question, but I am very new to this industry. So far, as I've written elsewhere, our product is pretty much selling itself. And thanks to the advice I've gotten so far from these forums, we are beginning to think about big-picture marketing. But I have an immediate concern - our retailers are asking for point of sale stuff and we don't have any other than the neck-tag we put on all our bottles. I have begun to ask specifically what they would like to have, but I wonder what others are doing - do you have shelf cards? Window posters? Postcards? Display props? Any thoughts would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks so much!

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Sorry if this is a dimwitted question, but I am very new to this industry. So far, as I've written elsewhere, our product is pretty much selling itself. And thanks to the advice I've gotten so far from these forums, we are beginning to think about big-picture marketing. But I have an immediate concern - our retailers are asking for point of sale stuff and we don't have any other than the neck-tag we put on all our bottles. I have begun to ask specifically what they would like to have, but I wonder what others are doing - do you have shelf cards? Window posters? Postcards? Display props? Any thoughts would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks so much!

We invested in a decent laser copier/printer that can do up to 12"x18". We do posters, shelf talkers, menu cards. Cost is very little- I'm leasing a Toshiba (very fast) for $200 a month includes the first 500 color prints per month, all toner and maintenance. We only pay for paper and .01/copy over 500. Also print office stuff with this too.

I also have a wide format printer left over from one of my previous careers. We print larger posters and the occasional banner but these are a bit more expensive.

I don't know if you use a distributor, but they should be willing to do some of this or at least split the cost with you.

Good luck!

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Thanks Guy - that all sounds manageable. I've been thinking of getting a new laser printer anyway and color ones are not that much more expensive. We are not using a distributer at present so we are completely on our own cost-wise.

But what do you mean by menu cards?

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I believe he is referring to the small rectangular cards that are either inserted into those two sided thing on a restaurant table ( either inverted V mini sandwich boards or inverted T Plexiglas) on a table that would list either list your products and some sugested drinks using them or at least list your product among others that they carry as a choice (you see them all the time - they usuallly carrry a wine or dessert list on one side and drinks on another).

They do work well as they are easy to make and don't go obsolete as fast as printing a food menu with your products on them- and a lot less hassle for the wait staff for the same reason.

They give good visibility (as most people know to look at them and some know that is where new items are to be found)and you don't have to buy/make a huge pile of them to get a price break -unlike all the imprinted key chains,pens,bottle openers and assorted other junk the other part of the industry seems to love so much ( I almost wonder if they have relatives in that trade you see so much of it).

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I don't know how most off-premise retailers today feel about shelftalkers. Historically, many consider them a pain and I can't imagine many retailers asking for them. Likewise small posters and things like that. If any of your off-premise retailers are merchandising from cut cases, what they want are case cards.

On-premise, they need something that will entice patrons into trying your product, so table tents and menu clip-ons can be important.

Sometimes when retailers ask for point-of-sale materials, that's code for permanent POS like mirrors, clocks, bins, etc. That's probably a dubious investment for most small distillers, at least at this point. Also, you have to be mindful of the regs about such things in the state or states where you do business.

Be careful about doing things on the cheap. Sometimes you can make the small, doing-it-on-a-shoestring thing work for you, but if you're not very careful and very clever it can just come across as cheap and small-time, which since most of you are selling quality and charging a premium price, can be deadly.

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