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Southernhighlander

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Southernhighlander last won the day on October 16

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About Southernhighlander

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  • Birthday 03/18/1966

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    http://distillery-equipment.com

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    Southern Missouri Ozarks

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  1. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    I would love to have you visit. We are 2.5 hours east of Springfield, 20 minutes east of the small town of Alton MO off 160 highway. If you want to vist and take the tour let me know and I will send you directions. GPS won't find me. If you visit I will show you some very interesting stuff.
  2. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    I agree with everything you wrote above and no where did I disagree. However, if the customers only viable option is a 300 gallon electric still running on single phase I am very glad to sell it to him/her and that is absolutely the right thing for me to do. So unless you are disagreeing with that we are on the same page. I know my business better than anyone. It is what I do everyday, 7 days most weeks. I love and enjoy every day of it. As far as it being my competitors prerogative to not sell larger electric stills, that is 100% correct. I hope they keep doing it that way, so I can keep getting the millions in business that they are missing out on.
  3. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    bluestar, I understood silkcity's point, which is why I said it is best to have 480v, and I certainly would not try to sell a customer a single phase still when that is not what they need. On the contrary, my point is that; I'm here to sell people the still that meets their specific needs. Believe it or not, there is a very broad range of specific needs out there. I recently sold a 300 gallon still to a man in a rural area, with no access to 3 phase, but he has 400 amps of single phase 240vac power in a building that once housed a small log furniture factory. He tried multiple equipment suppliers, before he came to me, and the two suppliers that did sell electric baine marie stills, said that it was unpractical to sell their electric Baine Marie stills in sizes larger than 150 gallons, and that they did not have any stills with single phase power. I on the other had exactly what he needed. His still has a 66kW heating system drawing 275 amps at 240vac single phase. I tried to push him toward a NG or LP fired low pressure steam boiler, but due to multiple factors beyond his control the low pressure steam boiler solution did not work for him. I have sold around 15 electric Baine Marie Stills larger than 150 gallons. Several were 300 gallons and the largest is 500 gallon with a 110,000 watt 240vac 3 phase heating system drawing 265 amps. I was guaranteed those sales, because my competitors thought it impractical to sell such things. Along with the sale of almost every still I sold the fermenters, mash cookers, mash pumps, CIP systems, pneumatic ethanol pumps, hoses, air compressors, receiving tanks, blending tanks, proofing tanks, etc. Not everyone bought all of their components from me, but most did. We are talking well over $1,000,000.00 in sales, because I could meet those peoples expectations, while my competitors couldn't. Here is how I do business: I try to have equipment to meet the needs of any customer no matter what those needs may be. Many times the customers in this business have so little experience and knowledge that they don't really know what their needs are, so I ask a great many questions to determine what equipment best meets their needs. While many of my competitors just want to sell the customer a still, with as little time, as possible invested in the sale, and then get them out of their hair, I want to sell the customer the still and other equipment that is most likely to make them successful. If that means, I spend 1 hr on the phone on the first call and dozens of hours on emails then so be it, because I know if he or she is successful they will come back and buy larger equipment when they up size. I have had some customers buy as many as 4 sets of equipment in 6 years which means I did my job pretty dam well. Also I never try to sell a customer anything that they do not need and I have systems that fit almost any budget. Speaking of electrical services. I have a 1,000 amp 240vac electrical service here. My employees run a bunch of large 3 phase and single phase Miller sincrowave welders, as well as a great deal of other fabricating and metal working equipment, from that 1000 amp service and of course, there is my electrical department with the construction area and a huge heating system test bed, that is set up to run all sizes of panels in all phases and voltages of American current, except for 600vac and 120vac. I know I'm going to hear, you can't do that, you are limited to single phase 240vac power. All 12,000 square ft of my shop, ware house and office space here was either wired by me or by my employees under my supervision. When I had my wood products business here, I had around 20 three phase motors, totaling over 350 hp, that all ran at the same time. There was 1 primary rotary phase converter, which was just an old used 40 hp motor that I bought from a junk dealer for peanuts, wired a little funny, with no start or run capacitors and a single phase pony motor to spin it up. Each of the other motors that ran the machinery acted as secondary phase converters, when not under a load. None of those motors were ever under full load, at the same time. Only 40% of them would have been under their max load at the same time, when we were running flat out with 8 employees (I automated as much as I could). All this was from a 1000 amp single phase 240volt power supply. Most every licensed electrician and electrical engineer will tell you that the electrical system, I just described could not possibly work, but they would be wrong. I experimented for days before I figured it out. See, I'm out in a very rural area, on the edge of the grid. It is not possible to get 3 phase power out here. A guy up the road from me tried to run a band saw mill with a 25hp 3 phase motor, using a professionally manufactured 40 hp phase converter. The 40hp created so much lamp flicker, when he started it, that the power company pulled his meter. I figured out a way around the lamp flicker in just a few minutes (no start capacitors) and the no start capacitor restriction helped me figure out a type of phase converter that is different than the norm and I still use one today for my 3 phase 300 and 500 amp Miller Sincrowave welders. I figure things out by experimentation and the taking of copious notes. The main thing that allowed me to do what I did, was the fact that there are no required electrical inspections here. I won't go on any further about this because no one is probably interested and it only fits the thread, because it shows my ingenuity and ability to think outside the box. If anyone really wants to know how it worked I can explain it and show pics of my current phase converter. I found out later, that I was certainly not the first person to do it the way that I did, but it is still pretty uncommon.
  4. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    Silk City. Yes, it is best if you have a 480 volt service, but we can build them for 208v, 230v or 240v 3 phase as well as 220v, 230v, 240v or 480v single phase.
  5. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    It is only cost effective in that size if there is no way that you can have an oil, Natural Gas or Propane Fired Boiler. The run time for whiskey, after the operating temp is reached is only 4 to 5 hrs. For prices on the big baine maries, you will need to email.
  6. I hope you all get the idea?

    Roger, that is some funny shit right there, I laughed my ass off. Thank you for brightening up my day.
  7. DYE China?

    Whiskeytango said "Well if you ever sell anything and you have the choice between filling a 26 gallon milk tank order or a 450 gallon still what would you do first?" I would do the 26 gallon first, but that is not a good comparison. A better comparison is, if we get an order for a 100 gallon pro series pot still and a separate order for 800 gallon Ultra Pro Vodka still, with a complete set of support equipment, then we will complete the orders in the sequence that we received them. That is the only just and moral way to do it. To do it the way that you suggest, is really, really shitty and I don't blame Lotusland for being angry. He has every right to be angry. Of course, if we have 1 still in stock and not the other, that changes things, but we explain that to our customers.
  8. New equipment

    Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC Below is a link to some reveiws. Below is a link to reviews of a different company Our mostly stainless stills, have devices within, that give you more copper vapor interaction than an all copper pot still, however if you want the still to be all copper we can do that. We can supply you with a 500 to 800 gallon complete set of equipment including the still, mash tun, fermenters, crash cooling equipment, pumps and a low pressure steam boiler without going over your budget. Please contact us for a complete quote at 417-778-6100 or email me paul@distillery-equipment.com http://distillery-equipment.com http://moonshine-still.co http://triclamp.co
  9. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    Hi Rick The still in the picture, is our 300 gallon, pro series, combination mash tun still, and it includes the electric baine marie heating system. The price is $36,132.00 The heat up to operating temp time, is around 1.5 hrs. The typical run time after operating temp is reached is only 4 hrs.
  10. Mash Tun Cooling: Part Deux

    Indy Spirits, Just to give you some other ideas, to help you solve your problem. Sometimes, a combination of methods is your best approach. Jeffw mentioned cycling your mash through the fermenter, using a tube in tube like mine. As he said, in so many words, you can be circulating through the fermenter, using the tube in tube, while you clean your mash tun. This will shorten your work day. As we all know, being able to do 2 things at once can save a huge amount of time. If your fermenter is jacketed, then you can cool with the fermenter jackets, at the same time that you are cooling with the tube in tube, which will reduce your cooling time significantly. Here is an idea. You could leave out 25% of the water that the recipe calls for, and do your first crash cool by just adding the cold water, and then do your last crash cool with the tube in tube and jacketed fermenter combination. If your agitator is not strong enough to leave out 25%, you could leave 12.5% of the water out, and use a combination of adding the 12.5% cold water to the mash and circulation through through the tube in tube. Another very good way, would be to add steam injection ports to the sides of the bottom of the tun and direct steam inject to cook the mash and use the jacket to do the crash cooling. Adding the steam injection ports is no big deal, as long as the tun does not have an insulation jacket. Silk City makes a very good point as well, "Surface area of the tube-in-tube is only part of the story, no?" Many times, people just don't consider all of the variables, when looking at things, so there calculations are incomplete. Here is something else, that is very important to consider. If necessity is the mother of invention, then imagination must be the father. Being very good at math can be a great benefit, but without imagination, your problem solving skills will be limited. For example 2 high school dropouts from Ohio solved the problem of powered flight, when all of the best, most educated engineers and PHDs in the world, at the time, could not get the job done. Edison only had a 7th grade education and he was one of the greatest inventors, that the world has ever known, and I believe that was due, in part, to his ability to imagine. When people said "You can't do that." It peeved his interest and many times, he would prove them wrong. While it is true that later in his career, his massive team of engineers and scientists did most of the work, it was still Edison's imagination that drove the whole thing. Of course Tesla had a great deal of imagination as well, in combination with extraordinary problem solving and engineering skills. When we believe that something will not work, because we don't do it that way, and we have heard, that it could not possibly be done that way, we are limiting ourselves. When we believe that our way is the best and only way and we won't consider trying another way, then we limit ourselves even more. Also, if we believe that some uneducated old moonshiner from Appalachia could not possibly have anything of value to offer us, as distillers and still builders, then we are limiting ourselves yet again, because he may know things, that were learned by his ancestors, through 300 years of trial and error. Sometimes these are simple things, but they can make all of the difference in the world, when you are starting out It's best to always keep your mind open and use your imagination. If someone tells me that I can't do something a certain way, my interest gets peaked, and I check the viability of actually doing it that way, because after all, there may be an original idea there, because it may be, that no one has tried it to find out. Of course, original ideas are extremely rare, since we normally just build on the ideas of others, which is fine as well. Indy, I know you might not think so, but I think that everything I have written above, applies to your OP, either directly, or indirectly and I sincerely hope that the information helps you with your problem I have been laying in bed with the flu the last couple of days, using my lap top to post here. I feel a little better now and I have spec sheets and designs to work on as well as about 100 emails to answer, so I am heading out for the office.
  11. Mash Tun Cooling: Part Deux

    If you do decide to use a tube and shell, I am glad to sell you one. There are certainly no hard feelings on my end. paul@distillery-equipment.com
  12. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    Rick, Unfortunately I have a bad case of the flu. Right now, I'm laying in bed using my laptop, so I don't have access to the info that I need to do the pricing for you. I hope to be back in the office tomorrow or Sunday and I will supply you with some pricing then. Thank you for the inquiry.
  13. Anyone have experience w/ Affordable Distillery Equipment LLC??

    Mike at MG thermal really knows his stuff when comes to cooling processes for distilleries. I recommend him to everyone.
  14. Mash Tun Cooling: Part Deux

    Indyspirits So how do you cool that much mash in 5 minutes? Its very simple. You do it the way my Granddaddy did. You leave 1/2 of the water out of the corn mash recipe. You add 1/4 of the amount of water that the recipe calls for at the correct temp for the first and second crash cools. With one of our veriflex pumps you can pump the water over in just a little over 1 minute for a 300 gallon batch. With the agitator on, the crash cool will be complete in 4 or 5 minutes. You can do this in my 300 gallon mash tuns because, all of the agitator components are 3 times stronger than what is necessary. So it's that simple, and of course it is a very old proven method. If your agitator is strong enough on your tun you can do the same. If you let me know the hp, shaft diameter, length of the shaft and the dimensions of your blades or impellers, I can tell you whether it is doable or not for you. If you run glycal through a steam jacket then you will ruin your boiler. Cooling in the steam jacket works well if you have a good well and are rural. You simply run your well water through the jacket without any glycol. Davis Valley Winery and distillery use this method in there two 800 gallon mash tuns and their 300 gallon mash tun. We sold them their Rite low pressure steam boiler. I think that we have sold at least 30 large Rite Low pressure steam boilers. I do hawk my equipment when people are looking for equipment or if they have a problem that they want to solve. I also give out a great deal of good information on here.
  15. Mash Tun Cooling: Part Deux

    Indyspirits, I'm sorry that you feel that way. I did make some good suggestions concerning your crash cooling dilemma, and after that I only replied to your statements. I certainly meant no offense, but I do apologize for offending you. So does that mean that you are not interested in my wager?
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