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How to Pressure Test a still?

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I've seen this mentioned a few times in threads, but how would I go about preforming this test?

Thanks! 

Holstein still, 1200 liter, 16 plates, with dephlegmator. 

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The supplier should have pressure tested it for you before it was sent to you. It should have pressure ratings listed on the jacket and on the pot, if it is rated.

If you are talking about testing your vacuum breakers and pressure relief valves, I have heard of people getting a second set to swap out and sending them out. At the brewery I used to work at, the owner would tear apart, clean and inspect the stainless PRVs we had. He would then hook just the valve up to a manifold with a calibrated pressure gauge and compressed air, and slowly ramp up the pressure to see at what PSI it popped at. He then recorded it and kept a log of all the different tests. 

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https://www.amazon.com/Quick-Disconnect-Clamp-Industrial-Stainless/dp/B075RS5GB6/ref=sr_1_4?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1542735354&sr=1-4&keywords=tri+clamp+to+air+fitting

Assuming you have a 1.5" tri-clamp fitting on the end of your condenser you can use the above fitting.  Just remove the parrot, replace with the tri-clamp to air adapter fitting and pressurize the still with compressed air.  Make sure your still has a pressure gauge you can view, and slowly fill her up until your relief valve pops.    Then just let the still sit under pressure for an hour (or overnight) and check that you dont have any noticeable drop in pressure.

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To check the pressure release valves the safest way is to remove them as Tom suggested. Screw them onto a manifold along with pressure gauges off the still and check them against an accurate gauge. I would play it a bit safer with HedgeBird's suggestion by filling the still with water to at least normal operating level, or even safer fill as far as practical before adding compressed air. If there is a large amount of compressed air in the still and it ruptures then there could be quite a BANG but if there is mostly water then there will be far less excitement in your day.

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Ill second @PeteB start with a hydrostatic test. Fill your whole still + column with water, you will find out very quickly if you have any leaks

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