mission5

100 Percent Corn Mash

8 posts in this topic

I've seen a number of labels "made from 100% corn," but how are is the corn converted, is it by simply using enzymes instead of malted grains?

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Thanks Dehner & fldme. So if I had ratio of 3:1 corn to water add amylase enzyme (ratio?), then I should have a mash that converts to fermentable sugars? If I distill and age in new charred oak, my end product will be 100% corn bourbon? If I age in used or uncharted oak I have corn whiskey as end product - yes?

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Thanks Dehner & fldme. So if I had ratio of 3:1 corn to water add amylase enzyme (ratio?), then I should have a mash that converts to fermentable sugars? If I distill and age in new charred oak, my end product will be 100% corn bourbon? If I age in used or uncharted oak I have corn whiskey as end product - yes?

Yes.

Consult with enzyme vendors on best application of enzymes (quantity, temps, etc.).

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Hey Mission 5,

Commercial enzymes would probably be the easiest way to go when converting 100% corn mashes.

However, I do believe there are some distillers that actually malt their corn fully or partially to activate the natural enzyme content in the corn, and use that to convert their mash. How feasible that is, and how efficient it is, I am not familiar with (gee I wonder why?), but some people do accomplish conversions with malted corn.

Cheers!

SpecZyme

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Just interested to know what sort of OG & FG any of you "all corn" guys are getting, and with what ratio of corn to mash water? What is a reasonable gravity to get in your corn mash cooking unmated corn & using enzymes to convert ?

Thanks chaps !!

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typical brix on our 100% corn mash is around 20

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