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Seeking help with my mash profile.  After heating and holding the mash (all wheat) and adding the alpha enzymes my pH is above 6.2.  I know this is the high end for alpha but the enzymes seemed to work well (no starch).  I added some citric acid to get the pH down but after adding 300g the pH had only dropped to 5.6 - still above the beta-amylase sweet spot.  I am using carbon filtered city water - any ideas of how to get the mash pH down to where the betas would be happy?  Thanks.

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You want to hit the sweet spot for the specific enzyme you are using, both for temperature, pH, and efficiency without denaturing. As the chemical reactions and breakdowns/conversions take place you will have fluctuations in your pH. It's normal to add acid at multiple times throughout a mash.

Your other enzymes might also work well over long periods of time (throughout the fermentation) and the pH will probably get into their effective range.  Keep in mind that if you drop your pH too low, when the yeast kick off you'll need to raise it up to avoid stressing/killing the yeast.

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5-10% backset/stillage.  This generally gets us close to the ballpark, with only small additions of citric being necessary to adjust our large batch volumes (2000l).  Our water is a little bit on the alkaline side and on the hard side, so it would require larger acid adjustments.

 Find a local chemical supplier and buy USP citric from them, you'll probably pay less than $2 a pound.

 

 

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