Jump to content
ADI Forums
indyspirits

Poll: Do you clarify your molasses

Recommended Posts

Topic is self-evident. We use molasses around 70% TSAI and don't clarify. We're considering starting to clarify. I'd be interested in pros/cons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use a baking/cooking grade of blackstrap molasses and do not clarify.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Florida Cracker said:

Blackstrap and I do clarify

Is the process to heat to 160 and let sit? Do you add any coagulating agents? How do you separate the good stuff from the bad stuff? (enquiring minds want to know!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should read Raphael Arroyo's patent for heavy rum production. He described in great detail the clarification process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't have a super-centrifuge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He also describes settling and siphoning. Adjustment of the pH causes the solids to precipitate. Then it could be separated. It would require a very strong pump or a vessel that could be tapped above the precipitate. I don't worry about the clarification because we use a high grade of molasses. 

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, indyspirits said:

Is the process to heat to 160 and let sit? Do you add any coagulating agents? How do you separate the good stuff from the bad stuff? (enquiring minds want to know!)

Indy, 

My process isn't very technical or difficult. I thin the molasses with the hot backset from the previous run, usually at a 50/50 ratio. Mix well and then put in a conical 55 gallon tank. I have added a spigot at the 2  gallon level that I use for taking off the "clarified" mixture. I only fill the tank to the 25 gallon mark for my runs but it could be totally filled. If filled all the way I would put the spigot at the 4 gallon mark minimum. I still get a little thick liquid at the spigot but most is pretty thin. The stuff I drain through the bottom drain is like a very thick milkshake. Although it probably isn't what most would consider clarified, it will remove most of the solids. I will let it sit for 2-3 days then rack off via the spigot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/13/2017 at 8:32 AM, Florida Cracker said:

Indy, 

My process isn't very technical or difficult. I thin the molasses with the hot backset from the previous run, usually at a 50/50 ratio. Mix well and then put in a conical 55 gallon tank. I have added a spigot at the 2  gallon level that I use for taking off the "clarified" mixture. I only fill the tank to the 25 gallon mark for my runs but it could be totally filled. If filled all the way I would put the spigot at the 4 gallon mark minimum. I still get a little thick liquid at the spigot but most is pretty thin. The stuff I drain through the bottom drain is like a very thick milkshake. Although it probably isn't what most would consider clarified, it will remove most of the solids. I will let it sit for 2-3 days then rack off via the spigot. 

We do the same. We start with the highest grade molasses we can get. We still get a lot of crap settled out. Besides the impact on the fermentation, it helps to keep the still from gunking up.

Only difference in our method is that we usually drain the ash/undesirable stuff from the bottom instead of racking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whats the end goal or what are you trying to accomplish?  Do you like the flavor of what you are making now? The flavor profile  will change maybe better maybe worse. Molasses may change harvest to harvest or over the course of the year as it gets older. It depends on whats growing in it. I alter my methods depending on my molasses and how much ash content

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We also settle to clarify. It's surprising the amount of ash and much that settles out. Flavor seems cleaner, ferments more stable, and not as much sludge carried into the still for stripping. May matter less when the bain marie still is used, but right now we are direct heat with electric elements, and less to possibly scorch is better. We rack off in the settling tanks using racking canes now, but may entertain dropping out the bottom once we get to using settling vessels with a bottom outlet/cone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aussie Cane Farm - Rum process here "Grass to Glass" you could say, we are a miniature version of Commercial Sugarcane Mill

Prior to Effet (Vac Evaporator) our 80L (22gal) Clarifer is a Conical Tank (Imhoff Tank design) @ pH 7.6-7.8.

Food grade Floc added as Clarifer is filled.

4-6 hr Settling time (needing improvement to sub 4 hrs & Continuous is best scenario)

Low & High offtake valves on Clarifier leaving ~20L (5gal) of Mud ('Mill Mud/ Filterpress')

This ~20L (5 gal) volume could & should be reduced to say ~8 litres (~2gal) of thick mud/ sludge and the supernatant collected or separated.

So ~10% Mud/Sludge of ~8L (2 gal) & ~72L (20gal) of Supernatant Clarified Cane Juice  is my personal goal.

That juice then gets reduced in the Effet to ~20L of 63-65 Brix Syrup.. Can be as high as 70..

Hot Syrup is cooled and used for fermentation as needed... am considering passing hot syrup through coffee/ oil cone filters prior to cooling to standardise the end product.

With Electrical utilities @ 25c/KwH - the above is very passive aside from a RIMS or HERMS config for heating cane juice on the Clarifier inlet comingf rom Mix Juicer @ 80+c.

Each Cane Varietal offers slight variances in the above summary - no different beast when using various corn/ maize or barley malt sources..

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we use blackstrap and we heat to 200F, dilute,  mix, and settle/clarify while covered and cooling, then rack and pitch 24 hours later.  Here are samples taken right after thorough mixing and set for 24 hours...  The one on the left had the molasses heated to 200 before adding water, the one on the right was only heated to 160, and you can see the growth, which takes the pH to 3.0 in days, kills the yeast, and causes a green distillate

IMG_20180216_153347.jpg

  • reaction_title_1 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×