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Foreshot

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Foreshot last won the day on August 24

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  1. I regularly google our brand name. Today I found a company that claims to have two of our products. They have what looks like the images from the TTB COLA website. We have never spoken to them nor did we give them permission to list our products. You may want to look up your brand names on there too. I couldn't find it on their website but you can find it via google: https://www.google.com/search?q=Site%3Acraftshack.com++"Company Name" I am not quite sure how to proceed as we don't have the money to engage in any kind of lawsuit with them. I figure they won't do anything if I email and complain. https://craftshack.com
  2. Think about 5s when you're working on this project. Shadowboards will save you a ton of transaction time. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5S_(methodology) https://toolkeepers.com/portfolio-item/foam-shadow-board-honsa-tools/ Great videos on it: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU0OXtC1xSvZsIiLBdQopaA You can hang the graduated cylinders like wine glasses. I figure that will save you some space.
  3. WT brings up really good points. This might seem like something easy but maybe put some thought into it. I think the biggest thing is tasting room retail vs whole to restaurants/distributors/retailers. If you're only selling tasting room only for a while then it's not something you probably need to figure out now. We setup our system to sell both.
  4. From a physical perspective we only do 6 to a box no matter how many we sell. Always ask your customer what their expectation is. Most places don't care but retailers tend to want 12 as that's what their normal is.
  5. Naw, you're just asking a question. You're doing exactly what you should be doing - looking forward to so what's coming next so you can plan for it. That's something different that isn't just alcohol. People, especially the younger generations, are getting advertising fatigue. There's so much advertising that it's starting to wear people out. And sadly that's a vicious cycle as now you need to advertise even more to effective.
  6. They are on the edges. Legal weed is a substitute. It has different side effects that some people prefer to the side effects of alcohol. That is likely. But there's always macro and micro trends. Right now the micro trend seems to favor local craft. Who knows how long that will last. Maybe in 10/20/30 years craft will continue to benefit at macro's expense. We're not even close to saturation and no where near over saturation. It's a nascent trend that the market and producers are still working out. Look how many types of soda pop there was and is. There won't be over saturation until you see major brands go tits up. Right now it's a blank slate with some outlines on it. There's plenty of room to play. You literally can go back through history and read how each generation thinks the next generation is going to be the downfall of humanity. I remember hearing about something exactly like that from something written in like 500 AD. Eventually it will be right but I doubt it will be anytime soon. Our society changes whether we want it to or not. It's human nature.
  7. Go with air power. It's super easy to set a rate with a pressure regulator. You can plumb the air pump way far away from where you work so you won't hear it. The fluid pumps themselves are generally pretty quiet. When I was doing sand blasting I setup the air pump on the other part of the building and put a large 100g receiver tank near where was working. I don't think you would need something that big but it would be a good idea to have something closer to the pump. It helps reduce cycling with the main pump, cools the air, and catches any fluid in the line. Also plumb in an on/off valve before the regulator so you can just turn that off and not mess with the regulator every time. One thing you didn't mention - do you pump solids or not? I'm assuming with a 3/8 feed to the still you're not. For non solids the Flojet G57 series might be just right for you depending on how low the flow rate is on the low side. It has 1/2" connections so you would only need a reducer on the output side. I wouldn't be concerned with the input side as your feed rate is really slow. https://www.tcwequipment.com/products/flojet-g57-air-diaphragm-pump
  8. I'm sharing this post so that people interested in starting a small distillery will see some of the trials and tribulations of what you're going to have to deal with. We're that in between size of distillery. The "tween" size. We're looking for a bigger space so we can get bigger equipment. So we bought a cheap RO system that does 50g a day and came with a 3g holding tank. Up to now that's been fine. Now though we've started needing more like 10-15g a day. The system can do it but it does it slowly. So we bought a bigger holding tank. I got all the fittings, plumbed everything up, and installed it. Awesome? No. So let's walk through what I had to deal with. Let's see how it started: Everything looks great, yes? All prim and proper. And so began the issues. It started out fine. But it would only hold like a gallon before the system stopped. I had an inkling that it was pressure related. The system runs off of mains pressure and does not have an electric pump. Because of that it can't build much pressure. So I turned the tank on it's side. That reduced the pressure as it didn't have to push up against the water column. It started working again but stopped after another gallon or so. So I took it to the next step: I did that an now it's working better. It seems to be filling up. I turned it off as I had to leave and didn't want something bad happening when I wasn't there. I'll turn it back on tomorrow AM and see how it holds up over the day. I'm anticipating that I'm going to get folks saying what I'm doing is a bad idea. I don't disagree. But until I figure something else out that's what we have. For those thinking about starting a small distillery this is the dumb day to day stuff that you have to deal with.
  9. Thanks & you're welcome.
  10. +1 on that. From my relatively limited experience it adds mouthfeel & reduces the burn of a young spirit.
  11. Question on the operation: This just uses mains water pressure? You don't need any kind of pressure booster?
  12. I started talking to these guys about bottles. I haven't gotten far so I can't tell you anything from experience. They have a plant in the EU they work with for bottles. https://premierinnovationsgroup.com/
  13. The best thing we ever did flavor-wise was to use RO water for proofing. It made the flavors much brighter vs. carbon filtered water as we were previously using.
  14. Start here: http://howtobrew.com/ https://homedistiller.org/wiki/index.php/Beginner's_Guide https://blog.homebrewing.org/what-is-diastatic-power-definition-chart/ http://beersmith.com/blog/2010/01/04/diastatic-power-and-mashing-your-beer/
  15. https://bdastesting.com/ Send them the whole bottle. Anything you do might contaminate it further.
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