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Rapid Distillation - The Hot Rod by Detroit Stillworks

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Our 800 gallon stripping still, with our over sized condenser set up to run GNS, will produce 2,500 to 3,000 proof gallons per day in one shift.  With the addition of one of our gin baskets/botanical baskets you can add whatever flavors that you like including grain flavors such as Rye etc.  The price for this unit is only $43,000.00  

We have a little 10 gallon unit that will produce 30 proof gallons of vodka, gin or grain flavored spirits from GNS in an 8 hr span and the price is less than $3,000.00, and it has it's own built in electric oil bath heating system.  We can supply GNS stills in many different capacities up to one that will produce 5,000 proof gallons per day.  We have equipment in over 145 distilleries in the USA, Canada, Mexico and Australia. If you have questions please email or call paul@distillery-equipment.com 417-778-6100 

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Can't you just turn on your still, pour the NGS in the top and drain it out the bottom ? Why are you even bothering to go through the charade  of running it ?

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19 hours ago, Roger said:

Can't you just turn on your still, pour the NGS in the top and drain it out the bottom ? Why are you even bothering to go through the charade  of running it ?

Agreed.

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These stills are great for running Gin using the maceration method and or a gin basket.  It is my understanding that most of the Gin distilleries in Britain do not make their own GNS in house.  Since GNS is a neutral and the flavor in Gin is dictated by the botanicals, I see no problem running GNS in a Gin still and putting craft on the bottle.  However, if someone is running GNS to make vodka and putting craft on the bottle, I believe that they are misleading their customers.

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I was in a "DSP" food processing plant recently that has over 40 alcohol products all labeled  "Produced and Bottled By" and claiming to be the only distillery in the state!

They give tours, sampling and show you one 200 gallon still and three 200 gallon fermentation tanks. I'm pretty sure they don't even bottle or warehouse it there.

Is it legal for the "product" to never even pass through the DSP Bonded area?

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On 8/8/2017 at 10:55 PM, Falling Rock said:

Is it legal for the "product" to never even pass through the DSP Bonded area?

No, it is not. CFR is clear, "production" is one of the labelling words for location for rectification done at the site. Sec. 19.71 Except as otherwise provided in this part, a person may only conduct operations as a distiller, warehouseman, or processor of distilled spirits on the bonded premises of a distilled spirits plant. This can be anything that can be limited to processing tasks, including mixing and bottling, so no distilling is involved. But since bottling and everything before it is done in the DSP bonded area, it will pass through the DSP bonded area.

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On 8/8/2017 at 2:04 PM, Silk City Distillers said:

Or just label as "Produced and Bottled By", and skip the pouring through the still entirely.

I am with this guy! No one even really knows what the wording on the back of the label means anyway.......

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8 hours ago, Dehner Distillery said:

I am with this guy! No one even really knows what the wording on the back of the label means anyway.......

Agreed, but more to the point, no one knows what the front of the label means, if producers continue to push the narrative that it "doesn't matter" and / or the customer is so dumb, they deserve to be deceived. 

The beer industry is going through fake craft pushback, as will the distilled spirits industry. 

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so what proof is this gns coming out of the truck at , are the cuts made or is it jus low wines off a commercial stripping run . it seems like a shame to by someone elses product just to bottle and label it . reminds me of when i worked in ethanol plant the product coming off tasted like something you by in a jar but could be redistilled into some thing resemble a vodka . basically bulk stripping run .

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as i was watching that video the guys comment about butchers not raising there own meat there is a outfit north of the city that breeds raises fattens and butchers there own cattle , there meat products sell for a premium because of there operation , high quality hand crafted beef lol . people need to be more aware of what there buying i think 

 

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1 hour ago, Roger said:

or the customer is so dumb, they deserve to be deceived. 

I know you didn't really mean what you typed there, or it came across in an unintended way.  We all know the customer is queen/king and their opinion is gospel.  But, when the customer genuinely feels that a "produced by" product is better than a "distilled by" product?  Certainly, you might educate the customer on what the differences are.  But, you really aren't trying to argue that a substandard "distilled by" product should get a pass because it's "craft produced", are you?  The product needs to stand on it's own merit first.

Agree on the fake craft pushback, but what about the headwnds generated by the crap craft pushback?

 

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29 minutes ago, Silk City Distillers said:

I know you didn't really mean what you typed there, or it came across in an unintended way.  We all know the customer is queen/king and their opinion is gospel.  But, when the customer genuinely feels that a "produced by" product is better than a "distilled by" product?  Certainly, you might educate the customer on what the differences are.  But, you really aren't trying to argue that a substandard "distilled by" product should get a pass because it's "craft produced", are you?  The product needs to stand on it's own merit first.

Agree on the fake craft pushback, but what about the headwnds generated by the crap craft pushback?

 

I was referencing the concept pushed by some in the industry, and that you will find in other threads on this forum, that some fake craft producers feel it should be "buyer beware" , and that customers are somehow not worthy of knowing what they are buying just because they don't know all 2400 pages of the CFR.

As for "crap craft pushback" somehow being a negative to the craft industry, surely you must not sample much craft beer. If you did, you would know that taste is entirely subjective, and does not need to fit the cookie cutter profiles that Big Bev wants customers to believe is the only thing worth drinking. 

Its trully sad that some consider the non-standardized flavor profiles of true craft as somehow being wrong, or that one must use bulk  "natural flavors" that are in most cases only "natural" because the beaver's ass the flavor came from is "natural" (look it up). 

The only think a craft distiller really needs to Concentrate on, is once you have a product that has been generally accepted by a reasonably sized cross section of customers, you need to be able to replicate that in a volume that fits your business plan. When people get used to expecting a specific flavor, they expect it time and again.  You can always push towards new and different flavors, but you should maintain the flavors of the successful sellers.  

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